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Conclusions: These results show that subacute exposure to amphetamines is associated with an advancement of cardiovascular-organismal age both over age and over time, and is robust to adjustment. That this is associated with power functions of age implies a feed-forward positively reinforcing exacerbation of the underlying ageing process.

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CHILDREN as young as 14 are becoming addicted to ice, some at the hands of their own parents, and police south of Brisbane are desperate to break the cycle. 

The Logan Child Protection Investigation Unit has seen a 10 per cent increase in methamphetamine-related cases this year and have launched an operation to reduce the devastating impact of ice on children.

Det Fletcher has seen some children so high they have not slept for three days and even parents supplying their own kids with drugs.

He said the habit is putting their lives at risk and is creating a “deep ripple effect” in the community, fuelling other serious crimes.

“They’re frying their brains basically,” he said.

Children are suffering at the hands of their drug addicted parents.

Acting detective senior sergeant Damian Cotter said the newly-launched Operation Velodrome was also to help curb the number of children being neglected by their ice-addicted parents.

“We’re seeing pure neglect where families are going without so the parents can get more ice,” act det sen sgt Cotter said.

“In one case police attended a welfare check on a family with very young children that on a number of occasions have been so drug affected they haven’t even been able to be woken.”

He believes the cost and availability is what is driving the prevalence of ice across the country.

“The accessibility has increased exponentially and the price has decreased, which is a bad combination,” act det sen sgt Cotter said.

In the 2017/18 financial year, police seized 47kg of ice and busted 139 drug labs in Queensland.

The Government’s newly announced campaign will target cutting supply and will be matched with a new Ice Help campaign to treat those addicted to the drug.

Ms Farmer said almost one in three children who come into the care of the Department of Child Safety had a parent who had used methamphetamine.

If you have any information, call Crimestoppers on 1800 333 000.

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Abstract

Background Amphetamine abuse is becoming more widespread internationally. The possibility that its many cardiovascular complications are associated with a prematurely aged cardiovascular system, and indeed biological organism systemically, has not been addressed.

Conclusions These results show that subacute exposure to amphetamines is associated with an advancement of cardiovascular-organismal age both over age and over time, and is robust to adjustment. That this is associated with power functions of age implies a feed-forward positively reinforcing exacerbation of the underlying ageing process.

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ICE wasn’t Andy’s first drug – no that was alcohol. He started bingeing at only 14. After using cannabis and some heroin, and then stopping for a season, Andy commenced ICE use after the death of his mother – it motivated him to get out of bed…but sadly much more than that followed.

Andy candidly, but unemotionally shares his concerns about the poor use of drug policy and the utter madness of ‘ICE Smoking Rooms’. Check out the full interview here…

Listen to interview now

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BY KATHY MCLEISH  APR 27, 2017

One-third of children who came into the care of the Queensland's Department of Child Safety in 2016 had parents who use or have used methamphetamines, most commonly ice, a new report has found.

About 60 per cent of those 749 children suffered neglect, about a third were subjected to emotional harm, 11 per cent experienced physical harm and 1 per cent were sexually abused.

Of the children with a parent who had used ice:

  • 59pc were neglected
  • 29pc experienced emotional harm
  • 11pc were physically harmed
  • 1 per cent had experienced sexual abuse

The study also found parents known to the child protection system used ice more regularly than alcohol. Of those who used the drug, more than two-thirds had a criminal history and about the same number had been diagnosed with a mental illness. About 68 per cent had experienced family and domestic violence in the past year. Most of the children affected were aged from newborn to five-year-olds.

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